ESSENTIAL NEWS FOR AGRI-RETAILERS
The Communicator

December Issue – See All

Ten Spots to Wine & Dine

If you are hosting an important meeting or an outing with your team, try one of these popular spots in downtown Saskatoon, just steps from the CAAR Conference host hotel.

E2 Regulations Update

New regulations increase the frequency of live emergency simulations.

The Constancy of Change

In April of 1997 a young writer, fresh out of college, started on the first phase of his career at a publisher working on ag magazines. That writer was me, and the first magazine I was assigned to work on was The Communicator. Things have changed a lot since then.

A Growing Concern

Is increased public scrutiny and pressure from export markets threatening the future of glyphosate?

Preparing for the Skills Revolution

Industry players and academic institutions are building skills to take on the revolution.

Sustainable Manure Management

Agronomists are putting sound agronomic advice to paper.

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The Communicator – CAAR’s flagship publication of news and perspectives from Canada’s agri-retail industry – has a brand new look and format, and will be hitting mailboxes this week.

Users can access pesticide labels from their electronic device

Health Canada has launched a new mobile app that allows users to access pesticide labels that have been registered for use in Canada.

CAAR, and sister association the Canadian Seed Growers Association (CSGA) are pleased to announce the launch of our latest project: The Investing in Certified Seed eLearning Program.

So you missed your chance to register online for the CAAR Conference. You’re not out of luck!

Health Canada announced earlier this week that they will stop granting conditional pesticide registrations, in a move towards transparency in their regulatory decisions.

When you bring your staff to the CAAR Conference, you’re gaining more than a team building getaway that strengthens your ability to work together. 

Farmers are doing more with less, and carrying on the important work they have done for centuries. However, their social license to produce the world's food is being threatened by consumer misconceptions.