As Canadian growers begin to look for a defense against broadleaf and grassy weeds this growing season, Arysta LifeScience offers EVEREST 2.0® Herbicide, an advanced formulation that is safe on wheat and offers application flexibility and lasting flush control on the toughest of grass weeds.

Containing flucarbazone, EVEREST 2.0 provides Flush-after-flush control of wild oats, green and yellow foxtail, mustards, pigweed, flixweed, wild buckwheat, volunteer canola and other resistant grass and broadleaf weeds.

“In a side-by-side trial, EVEREST 2.0 was able to relieve wild oat pressure,” said Trent McCrea, Marketing Manager, Canadian Herbicides, Arysta LifeScience. “The wild oat population treated with EVEREST 2.0 was significantly reduced and later flushes were starting to shrink down and were visibly smaller than the wild oats in the field treated with the competitor’s product.”

Application Flexibility

The long-lasting residual soil control of EVEREST 2.0 allows for complete application flexibility. Growers can spray early to remove weed pressure while taking advantage of flushing control, or spray later as weather and scheduling allow.

EVEREST 2.0 offers a high-quality formulation, tank-mix flexibility and ultra-low use rates that reduce the need for an extra pass through the field.

Crop Safety

With advanced safener technology built in, EVEREST 2.0 is selective on spring and durum wheat varieties in a wide range of conditions. When applied early, EVEREST 2.0 allows young wheat a better chance to become established while improving yield potential.

For additional information on EVEREST 2.0, contact your local Arysta LifeScience sales representative or visit www.arystalifescience.ca.

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