Keep it Clean

Be Aware of the Products of Concern for Cereals

You can help your customers protect their investments, and the marketability of their wheat, barley and oats, by being aware of the crop protection products which could create market risk when used on cereal crops. Keep reading for the 2020 products of concern for cereals.

Know the 2020 Products of Concern for Pulses

Keep it Clean has released its 2020 Pulse MRL Advisory with information on the crop protection products which could restrict marketing options for Canadian pulse crops. As the growing season kicks off across the country, retailers are encouraged to learn the products of concern listed below and communicate them to their customers.

Growers Advised to Check With Their Grain Buyer About Quinclorac Use in 2018

The Canola Council welcomes the recent decision of the Codex Committee on Pesticide Residues to advance for adoption the proposed maximum residue limit (MRL) for quinclorac in canola. While this is a positive step, to date, an international MRL at Codex is not yet formally adopted. The Codex Alimentarius Commission is expected to officially adopt the report of the Codex Committee on Pesticide Residues at its July 2018 meeting.

U.S. Tolerance Established for MANIPULATOR Plant Growth Regulator

Cereals Canada is pleased that the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has established a maximum residue limit on chlormequat chloride, the active ingredient in MANIPULATOR Plant Growth Regulator.

Cam Dahl, President of Cereals Canada noted that this is good news for Canadian farms. “This is a potentially valuable tool that has seen limited use in Canada because of the lack of approval in the U.S. and the market risk that this entailed. That barrier to use has been removed.”

Concerning Products of Concern

Agri-retailers can support market access by helping growers Keep it Clean.

Maximum residue limits (MRLs) are playing an increasingly important role in the acceptance of Canadian agriculture commodities in domestic and export markets. However, one of the challenges growers face is that the limits are not always uniform across markets, or they may not yet be established in export markets.

Canadian growers must continue to follow best application practices to keep residues within acceptable limits and markets open. To do so, growers need to know which products can cause concern in certain markets.